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62 years of global warming in 13 seconds

Join us on Tuesday, January 14th for “FEARS: Where not everyone shares your pain” – get details and reserve your seat HERE.



Fareed Zakaria nails the climate change, entitlement spending asteroid connection: They’re both about our preference for instant gratification.

Join us on Tuesday, January 14th for “FEARS: Where not everyone shares your pain” – get details and reserve your seat HERE.

Fareed Zakaria has an answer to the question of why, if the science is not really in dispute, it is so difficult for us to actually do something about it? It also explains why economic reforms are so hard to make. It’s because we don’t delay gratification well anymore…

“It wasn’t always thus. The great sociologist Daniel Bell once wrote that the best way to describe the Protestant ethic that produced capitalism and the industrial revolution and the Rise of the West was one phrase, two words – delayed gratification. But there are few Calvinists left today, and the spirit of our age might be better described with one word change – instant gratification.”



Rolling Stone on our climate change “asteroid” | Goodbye, Miami!

8622594370_3bddfefc36Join us on Tuesday, January 14th for our 2nd Dinner at the Square of our season “Asteroids Club” – the dinner is “FEARS: Where not everyone shares your pain” – get details and reserve your seat HERE. In the meantime, here’s a must-read on the impact of the climate change “asteroid” on our state.

“Even more than Silicon Valley, Miami embodies the central technological myth of our time – that nature can not only be tamed but made irrelevant. Miami was a mosquito-and-crocodile-filled swampland for thousands of years, virtually uninhabited until the late 1800s. Then developers arrived, canals were dug, swamps were drained, and a city emerged that was unlike any other place on the planet, an edge-of-the-world, air-conditioned dreamland of sunshine and beaches and drugs and money; Jan Nijman, the former director of the Urban Studies Program at the University of Miami, called 20th-century Miami “a citadel of fantastical consumption.” Floods would come and go and hurricanes might blow through, but the city would survive, if only because no one could imagine a force more powerful than human ingenuity. That defiance of nature – the sense that the rules don’t apply here – gave the city its great energy. But it is also what will cause its demise…”

“Protecting the city, if it is possible, will require innovative solutions.” Those solutions are not likely to be forthcoming from the political realm. The statehouse in Tallahassee is a monument to climate-change denial. “You can’t even say the words ‘climate change’ on the House floor without being run out of the building,” says Gustafson.”

From Rolling Stone, July 2013 by Jeff Goodell (Photo credit.)



Climate change asteroid: What if they are right?

asteroid smallJoin us on Tuesday, January 14th for “FEARS: Where not everyone shares your pain” – get details and reserve your seat HERE. In the meantime, a quote to ponder on climate change…

The latest research, including an assessment by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, suggests that sea level could rise more than six feet by the end of the century. James Hansen, the godfather of global-warming science, has argued that it could increase as high as 16 feet by then – and Wanless believes that it could continue rising a foot each decade after that. “With six feet of sealevel rise, South Florida is toast,” says Tom Gustafson, a former Florida speaker of the House and a climate-change-policy advocate. Even if we cut carbon pollution overnight, it won’t save us. Ohio State glaciologist Jason Box has said he believes we already have 70 feet of sea-level rise baked into the system.

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From Rolling Stone, by Jeff Goodell